Curatorial Statement

A city is never a passive environment: it is an echo chamber for all the vibrations constantly created and modulated by its inhabitants. Being aware of these vibrations enable people to keep track of how they connect to their environment, and to learn about themselves.

 

The selected artworks make use of electronic sounds, urban screenings, interactive sensors and streamline video’s connections. Above all they deal with the human dimension that is the primary component of these new technologies. The vibrations can be understood as expressing the living part of the city: they make it possible for people to find some space for freedom and creation beyond the limits of technology, the rigid way-of-life frameworks and even beyond rational urban planning.

 

New media art constantly plays with the notion of reality in order to bring people to its very boundaries, thus extending the field of the possible. If technology enables us to reveal what is hidden, it also allows us to distort, and even invent reality. What does this mean when dealing with human vibrations? Turning visible the unseen vibrations that are shaping the city raises the question of the perception of these vibrations, but also of their identification, interactions and possible manipulations.

 

In a time when people cannot anymore trust their common sense to judge and apprehend reality, the connection between each other might matter more than the capacity to sort out between illusion from projection or a so-called reality. Yet the issue of control remains: individuals tend more and more to be identified, labelled, and formatted.

 

Working with different media, and coming from very different backgrounds, the featured artists formulate new visual languages to deal with this increasingly complex reality saturated with signs, norms and data. All of them are searching for a path that would expose us to its human and intangible expression.

 

The artworks will be displayed in public space to integrate with the urban fabric and to question the public space itself, whether it offers appropriate room for allowing these vibrations to develop and to integrate harmoniously.
 

 

Caroline Ha Thuc